Top 5 Best Kitchen Faucets from Pfister Reviews

We have a general tendency to give a purchase some thought based only on how big of an investment we are making on it. Bathtubs, for example, are both physically grandiose and on the higher end of the price bracket spectrum compared to most other aspects of your plumbing system. Faucets, however, are particularly important despite their minuscule scale. I would argue they are as important as getting the right bathtub, if not more so, because faucets are something you will be interacting with much more frequently and on a daily basis.

Now you might be tempted to ask yourself why you should consider me a believable authority when it comes to faucets – and to answer it, I simply say that I am an user just like you putting out honest reviews so that you have some reliable general idea about various brands and the quality of their products. As a homemaker, I have personally used numerous faucets from over twenty brands. these products have all underwent a trial by general usage – over a period ranging from roughly 1 to 5 years to monitor how much the performance changes over a couple months. Anyhow, since a singular perspective can be opinionated, I have done everything to see whether my findings in my personal experience are also similar to the collective consensus. I have read nearly all reviews related to the tested faucet products on amazon, reddit, and third-party blogs and factored them in.

The most obvious aspect that distinguishes the various categories of kitchen faucets, so to speak, is the mechanism to get the water flowing. Gone are the days of rotating a knob to tighten and loosen a valve to get the water; today’s technology allows us to have touchless faucets that will automatically turn itself on sensing hand movement under the tap. The most popular types of faucet today include pull-down faucets, smaller pull-out faucets, two-handle faucets, or the good old commercial style faucet – each with its own set of merits.

This is not to forget that there are various other core elements that makes a faucet better than the next. In the reviews, I will be focusing on the design, the finish, the user experience (i.e. general functionality), and whether these justify the price bracket.

In this article, I will be looking at the top-of-the-line products from Pfister. Let us get to it without further ado.

Pfister Cagney 1-Handle Pull-Down Kitchen Faucet

It might be worthwhile to mention this first, because this applies to all the reviews on this page. All the Pfister faucet products meet the requirements put out by ADA (Americans With Disabilities Act)/ANSI (American National Standards Institute), and thus cleared and certified for easy handling and accessibility for disabled persons. Now to get to the Pfister Cagney, it is the current standard Pfister product in line with recent market trends. It is a single-handle faucet that comes with a 1-hole to 4-hole installation support. The faucet handle is easy and smooth. As with all high-arc swivel spouts, it has 360-rotation, so it is useful when you want your manual dishwashing done without a hand-wand. To enable this, it also has several built-in spray modes, including the regular stream of water and a more spread-out jet. If you want a higher water flow capacity, there is also a 3-hole option that has up to 2.2 gpm flow rate. I have personally found the standard 1.8 gpm adequate enough for regular homemaking, however. It also comes with a soap dispenser that I have found easy to refill so far into six months of usage.

Pfister G13310SS Pfirst Series 1-Handle Pull-Out Kitchen Faucet

For a standalone, seemingly basic and normal tap, the G133 is quite bulky in its design – whether I begin at its 3-hole base support, or its quirky spout design that is unlike any other pull-out faucet I have seen to date. However, it is much more than meets the eye. I was pleasantly surprised to find out that this faucet has an easily toggleable alternate spray-mode function, for starters. It has a very elegant pull-down lever, and lots of options for its finish – other than the standard stainless steel and polished chrome finish, it also has a Tuscan Bronze and a white variant that fits standard white sinks perfectly without a deck mount to pimp it up. The one issue I do take with this faucet is that the water pressure in its spread-out spray mode is too high, and splashes water all over the place if you attempt to, say, wash platters.

Pfister G529-PFSS

If you want a modern arcing spout in a limited amount of space, where you would usually put a smaller standalone small-spouted centerset faucet, then the G529 is the perfect option for you. This is as grandiose as a standard 1-hole installation gets in terms of size and design: it can be installed without a deck mount as well, and it has the benefit of a mounted switch on the base of the spout. This means a simple installation process with all the quality of life a 360 rotation spout can bring. I have the Tuscan Bronze finish variant, which I have found to be extremely smooth and of no-nonsense pure metal (there are also the usual stainless steel and polished chrome finish variants if you prefer more familiar colours).

Pfister LF042VGKK Vega Single Control 4 Inch Centerset Bathroom Faucet

It might be worth pointing out that this one is an oddball in terms of design. Most others in its line go for, say, a flat, minimal, and sleek design – or perhaps a curvy, round-spouted design with an oval body given that it is a dinky centerset tap. But instead of that, Pfister’s Vega is a square design. The spout is a category called ‘the waterfall spout’, which both looks modern and yet reminiscent of a 20th century tube well.

I have already mentioned that it is tiny, and this will likely be telling for you. The Pfister Vega is a simple water tap that does not go down the path of feature-creep and fluff. It has no spray pattern controls and such extra functionalities. So when buying these, you will usually need only look for two qualities – firstly, how easy it is to handle, and secondly, whether it is prone to leakage problems.

I have used the Polished Chrome finish, and found it to be smooth and reasonably good. There is also a Brushed Nickel variant available if you prefer a darker finish.

As for the latter, one would have some doubts by looking at the design of an ‘waterfall spout’: it has an open top for more than half of its length. However, I have not have a single case of leakage for the seven months I have used it. It is extremely simple to turn on with just a flick, and its installation also follows suit into its plug-and-play nature with zero complexities and maintenance hassles that some more modern solutions might bring.

This also comes with an extra goodie: a Push & Seal easy drain assembly-press. Simply put, you can install this at the floor of your sink to easily lock and unlock the drainage of water with a single tap.

Pfister LF0264TWS Cadenza 1-Handle Kitchen Faucet

Pfister’s Cadenza was designed particularly to tick off for kitchens built with a vintage aesthetic in mind. This might as well be its apparent selling point, because its intricately designed oval base for all four components really stand out. And this will also be pretty much whether you want to buy the Cadenza or a number of older Pfister models that are about the same in terms of functionality.

I would like to make it clear on the outset that it is a demanding 4-hole installation that requires quite a bit of place. I have personally installed this on my largest, dual-bowl kitchen sink where I can best utilize all of its functions.

I will begin with the faucet, since we are primarily reviewing faucets to begin with. I have installed the whole set on a docking plate, and I recommend the same to you for preventing leakage concerns. The spout has a high-arc design and swivels like its design would lead you to believe. Overall, I have no complaints about it; the pressure is adequate for dishwashing. The faucet control is also very smooth and remained the same over a sustained period of usage.

This brings us to the designated tool for it: the hand wand. This is where most of the complaint comes in about this product. The handle looks like polished metal, but is actually plastic – but this is not a demerit in and of itself, as this also makes it light. The real qualm I have with the hand wand is that the base water pressure did not feel adequate compared to what I can usually get for its price.